Easy Whole Wheat Biscuits

These whole wheat biscuits have the delicious tang of buttermilk and a mild, nutty whole wheat flavor without being heavy or dense. They are so easy to make with just six ingredients. You can have them on your table in no time!

Easiest 100% Whole-Wheat Biscuits, made with white whole-wheat flour are unbelievably light and tender.

The best homemade biscuits have plenty of flaky layers and slightly crispy bottoms. These whole wheat biscuits are amazing with a spread of butter and honey. Be sure to serve them warm, because that’s when they are most delicious.

Easiest 100% Whole-Wheat Biscuits, made with white whole-wheat flour are unbelievably light and tender.

When I want to make homemade bread for dinner, I often make my classic biscuit recipe or these whole wheat biscuits because they are so quick and easy. These biscuits are 100% whole grain, but since they’re made with white whole wheat flour, they are not heavy or dense as some whole wheat baked goods tend to be. These homemade biscuits are light and tender with the delicious tang of buttermilk and the nutty flavor of whole wheat.

I go through white whole wheat flour like you would not believe. It has a milder flavor than regular whole wheat flour and it’s perfect for baking. I use white whole wheat flour in my pancake recipe, banana bread, my favorite homemade bread, and delicious pumpkin muffins.

Easiest 100% Whole-Wheat Biscuits, made with white whole-wheat flour are unbelievably light and tender.

So what exactly makes white whole-wheat different from regular whole-wheat? White whole-wheat flour is simply made from a different kind of wheat, white wheat. Regular whole-wheat flour is made from red wheat, which has a slightly stronger (think bitter) taste. White wheat is milder in flavor and has a softer texture, making the wheat flavor (and texture) less noticeable in baked goods.

Both white and regular whole-wheat flour are made from the whole grain: the bran, germ, and endosperm. Since they’re made from all three parts of the wheat grain, both have the same increase in fiber and nutritional benefits, including a reduced risk of heart disease and diabetes.

Now that I’ve shared that little nutrition lesson with you, are you ready to start substituting white whole-wheat flour for all-purpose in your baking? The more you do, the less you will even notice a difference. Promise.

Easiest 100% Whole-Wheat Biscuits, made with white whole-wheat flour are unbelievably light and tender.

How to make whole wheat biscuits

To make this easy biscuit recipe, you’ll start by whisking together your dry ingredients: white whole wheat flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. This recipe uses a full tablespoon of baking powder to help the biscuits rise as they bake.

Next you’ll add cold butter cubes to the dry ingredients. You want to cut the butter up really small, so that you can quickly and easily work it into the flour with your fingers. Press the butter pieces and flour together using your fingertips until the largest pieces of butter are the size of small peas.

Add the buttermilk to the bowl. Mix with a fork until the dough comes together. Then press the dough out into a 1-inch thick circle. Use a biscuit cutter or inverted glass to cut out the biscuits. Cut them straight down, without twisting the cutter, as twisting can seal off the edges and prevent your biscuits from rising.

Bake the biscuits until they are golden brown on top. Serve warm, with butter, honey or jam. Find the full recipe, with ingredient amounts and baking time, below.

Baking Tips for Biscuits

  • If you don’t have buttermilk in your refrigerator you can use my easy buttermilk substitute.
  • Instead of cutting the butter into cubes, you can freeze the butter for 30 minutes and then grate it on a box grater. This way, you don’t have to use your fingers to work it in. You can simply stir the shredded butter into the flour mixture using a fork.
  • Press straight down with your biscuit cutter, don’t twist. Twisting can seal off the edges of the biscuits and prevent your biscuits from rising.

 

Easy Whole Wheat Biscuits

Who doesn't love a light, tender buttermilk biscuit? These easy whole wheat biscuits have the delicious tang of buttermilk and a mild, nutty whole-wheat flavor without being heavy or dense. They are so easy to make with just six ingredients. You can have them on your table in no time!
Course Bread
Cuisine American
Keyword whole wheat biscuits
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time12 mins
Total Time27 mins
Servings 12 biscuits
Calories 134kcal

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups white whole wheat flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 5 tablespoons cold unsalted butter cut into ¼-inch cubes
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons cold buttermilk

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • In a large bowl, whisk together white whole wheat flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt until well combined.
  • Add in the cold butter pieces and use your fingertips to quickly work the butter into the flour by pressing the butter into the flour between your fingertips. Much of the flour will not yet be incorporated with the butter, what you want is for the largest butter pieces to be the size of small peas.
  • Pour in the buttermilk and use a fork to mix until a dough forms. Transfer the dough and any remaining flour bits to a lightly floured work surface. Use your hands to quickly fold the dough a few times to work in any remaining flour, being careful not to over-work the dough. Press the dough into a 1-inch-thick circle.
  • Use a 2 ½-inch biscuit cutter to cut out the biscuits; place them on the parchment-lined baking sheet. Re-form the scraps into a new circle of dough as needed. Bake biscuits for 12 minutes, until golden brown.

Nutrition

Serving: 1biscuit | Calories: 134kcal | Carbohydrates: 19g | Protein: 4g | Fat: 5g | Saturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 13mg | Sodium: 165mg | Potassium: 159mg | Fiber: 3g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 155IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 85mg | Iron: 1mg
Nutrition information is an estimate.
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